The DC Area Black Men's Group is a devoted group of men of African decent who come together in a spirit of authentic spirituality and trust.  Watch this video to learn about the group and what it does at the Washington, DC Baha'i center.

 

This statement on Race Unity from The US Baha'i national governing institution provides context on how Baha'is consider racism in the United States.

    Racism is the most challenging issue confronting America. A nation whose ancestry includes every people on earth, whose motto is Epluribus unum, whose ideals of freedom under law have inspired millions throughout the world, cannot continue to harbor prejudice against any racial or ethnic group without betraying itself. Racism is an affront to human dignity, a cause of hatred and division, a disease that devastates society. Notwithstanding the efforts already expended for its elimination, racism continues to work its evil upon this nation. Progress toward tolerance, mutual respect, and unity has been painfully slow and marked with repeated setbacks.

     The recent resurgence of divisive racial attitudes, the increased number of racial incidents, and the deepening despair of minorities and the poor make the need for solutions ever more pressing and urgent. To ignore the problem is to expose the country to physical, moral and spiritual danger. Aware of the magnitude and the urgency of the issue, we, the National Spiritual Assembly of the Baha'is of the United States, speaking for the entire U.S. Baha'i community, appeal to all people of goodwill to arise without further delay to resolve the fundamental social problem of this country. We do so because of our feeling of shared responsibility, because of the global experience of the Baha'i community in affecting racial harmony within itself, and because of the vision that the sacred scriptures of our Faith convey of the destiny of America.


Read the complete statement The Vision of Race Unity: America's Most Challenging Issue written by the National Spiritual Assembly of the Baha'is of the United States in 1991.